February 22, 2017

familia CATHARTIDAE cambia de Accipitriformes a CATHARTIFORMES 57th Supplement: Auk 2016

Order CATHARTIFORMES: New World Vultures
Notes.—Phylogenomic analyses of nuclear and mitochondrial
DNA sequences have shown that the Cathartidae
are sister to the rest of the Accipitriformes and that
they are as old as or older than other lineages recognized
as orders (Jarvis et al. 2014, Prum et al. 2015). Formerly
treated as a family within the Accipitriformes (Chesser et
al. 2010), Falconiformes sensu lato (Banks et al. 2007), or
Ciconiiformes (AOU 1998).
Move the heading Family CATHARTIDAE: New World
Vultures and the genus and species accounts included under
this heading to a position following this newly inserted order,
and delete the Notes under Cathartidae.

Posted on February 22, 2017 17:30 by momoto-erick momoto-erick | 0 comments | Leave a comment

CAMBIOS EN EL ORDEN LINEAL EN AVES 57th Supplement: Auk 2016

Notes.—Linear sequence of orders in Neoaves follows the
genomic studies of Jarvis et al. (2014) and Prum et al. (2015)
and numerous less comprehensive studies. Results of these
studies indicate that Neoaves consists largely of three
radiations: a poorly resolved initial radiation at the base of
the Neoaves (consisting of Phoenicopteriformes, Podicipediformes,
Columbiformes, Pterocliformes, Mesitornithiformes,
Cuculiformes, Musophagiformes, Otidiformes, Caprimulgiformes,
Steatornithiformes, Nyctibiiformes, Podargiformes,
Aegotheliformes, Apodiformes, Opisthocomiformes, Gruiformes,
and Charadriiformes) and better-resolved radiations
of core waterbirds (Gaviiformes, Sphenisciformes, Procellariiformes,
Ciconiiformes, Suliformes, and Pelecaniformes,
with Phaethontiformes and Eurypygiformes the apparent
sister group to these) and core landbirds (Cathartiformes,
Accipitriformes, Strigiformes, Coliiformes, Leptosomiformes,
Trogoniformes, Upupiformes, Bucerotiformes, Coraciiformes,
Piciformes, Cariamiformes, Falconiformes, Psittaciformes,
and Passeriformes).
Change the linear sequence of the orders between
GALLIFORMES and TROGONIFORMES, and their
included family headings and genus and species accounts, to:
PHOENICOPTERIFORMES
PODICIPEDIFORMES
PTEROCLIFORMES
COLUMBIFORMES
CUCULIFORMES
CAPRIMULGIFORMES
STEATORNITHIFORMES [see below]
NYCTIBIIFORMES [see below]
APODIFORMES
GRUIFORMES
CHARADRIIFORMES
EURYPYGIFORMES
PHAETHONTIFORMES
GAVIIFORMES
PROCELLARIIFORMES
CICONIIFORMES
SULIFORMES
PELECANIFORMES
CATHARTIFORMES [see below]
ACCIPITRIFORMES
STRIGIFORMES

Posted on February 22, 2017 17:19 by momoto-erick momoto-erick | 0 comments | Leave a comment

SEPARACION DEL ORDEN CAPRIMULGIFORMES 57th Supplement: Auk 2016

3. [pp. 267–274] Phylogenomic analyses of nuclear
DNA sequences have shown that the ordinal limits and
linear sequence of families in the traditional order
Caprimulgiformes do not reflect their evolutionary relationships
(Hackett et al. 2008, Prum et al. 2015). Their
findings result in the following changes:
Change the heading Order CAPRIMULGIFORMES:
Goatsuckers, Oilbirds, and Allies to Order CAPRIMULGIFORMES:
Nightjars, and insert the following Notes
after this heading:
Notes.—Formerly included Steatornithidae, Nyctibiidae,
and extralimital families Podargidae and Aegothelidae, but
phylogenomic analyses of nuclear and mitochondrial DNA
sequences have shown that the traditional order Caprimulgiformes
is paraphyletic with respect to the Apodiformes
(Hackett et al. 2008, Jarvis et al. 2014, Prum et al.
2015) and that lineages in this order that are traditionally
ranked as families are as old or older than most currently
recognized orders (Mayr 2014, Prum et al. 2015).
Change the heading Family CAPRIMULGIDAE: Goatsuckers
to Family CAPRIMULGIDAE: Nightjars.
After the species account for Caprimulgus indicus,
insert the following heading and Notes:
Order STEATORNITHIFORMES: Oilbirds
Notes.—See Notes under Caprimulgiformes.
Move the heading Family STEATORNITHIDAE: Oilbirds,
and the genus and species accounts included under
this heading to a position following this newly inserted order.
After the species account for Steatornis caripensis, insert
the following heading and Notes:
Order NYCTIBIIFORMES: Potoos
Notes.—See Notes under Caprimulgiformes.
Move the heading Family NYCTIBIIDAE: Potoos, and
the genus and species accounts included under this
heading to a position following this newly inserted order

Posted on February 22, 2017 17:16 by momoto-erick momoto-erick | 0 comments | Leave a comment

October 18, 2015

Separacion del ermitaño mexicano del ermitaño colalarga-suplemento 56 AOU (AUK vol 132 2015)

Phaethornis mexicanus is treated as a species separate from P. longirostris. In the species account for P. longirostris, change the distributional statement and Notes to: Distribution.—Resident [longirostris group] on the Gulf-Caribbean slope from Veracruz, Tabasco, northern Oaxaca, and northern Chiapas south through Central America to Nicaragua, on both slopes of Costa Rica and Panama, and in northern Colombia and northwestern Venezuela; and [baroni group] in South America west of the Andes in western Ecuador and northwestern Peru. Notes.—Groups: P. longirostris and P. baroni Hartert, 1897 [Hartert’s Hermit]. Formerly considered conspecific with extralimital P. superciliosus (Linnaeus, 1766) [Longtailed Hermit], but separated (Banks et al. 2002) largely on morphological grounds. See Notes under P. mexicanus.
Before the species account for P. longirostris, insert the following new account:
Phaethornis mexicanus Hartert. Mexican Hermit.
Phaethornis mexicanus Hartert, 1897, Ibis, p. 425. (Dos Arroyos, near Chilpancingo, Guerrero.)
Habitat.—Tropical Lowland Evergreen Forest, Montane Evergreen Forest (100–1,900 m; Tropical and Subtropical zones). Distribution.—Resident [griseoventer group] in western Mexico from west-central Nayarit (near Tepic and San Blas) south to Jalisco (Sierra de Autla ´n, Mineral San Sebastian) and Colima (Cerro Grande); and [mexicanus group] in Guerrero and western Oaxaca. Notes.—Groups: P. griseoventer Phillips, 1962 [Jalisco Hermit] and P. mexicanus. Formerly considered conspecific with P. longirostris, but treated as a separate species on the basis of differences in vocalizations, behavior, genetics, and morphology (Arbela ´ez-Cort´es and Navarro-Sig¨uenza 2013, Howell 2013, McGuire et al. 2014).

Posted on October 18, 2015 08:52 by momoto-erick momoto-erick | 2 observations | 0 comments | Leave a comment

October 09, 2015

reorganizacion del genero heraclides

A new Heraclides swallowtail (Lepidoptera, Papilionidae)
from North America is recognized by the pattern on its neck
expand article infoKojiro Shiraiwa, Qian Cong, Nick V. Grishin

Heraclides rumiko Shiraiwa & Grishin, sp. n. is described from southwestern United States, Mexico, and Central America (type locality: USA, Texas, Duval County). It is closely allied to H. cresphontes (Cramer, 1777) and the two species are sympatric in central Texas. The new species is diagnosed by male genitalia and exhibits a nearly 3% difference from H. cresphontes in the COI DNA barcode sequence of mitochondrial DNA. The two Heraclides species can usually be told apart by the shape and size of yellow spots on the neck, by the wing shape, and the details of wing patterns. “Western Giant Swallowtail” is proposed as the English name for H. rumiko. To stabilize nomenclature, neotype for Papilio cresphontes Cramer, 1777, an eastern United States species, is designated from Brooklyn, New York, USA; and lectotype for Papilio thoas Linnaeus, 1771 is designated from Suriname. We sequenced DNA barcodes and ID tags of nearly 400 Papilionini specimens completing coverage of all Heraclides species. Comparative analyses of DNA barcodes, genitalia, and facies suggest that Heraclides oviedo (Gundlach, 1866), reinstated status, is a species-level taxon rather than a subspecies of H. thoas (Linnaeus, 1771); and H. pallas (G. Gray, [1853]), reinstated status, with its subspecies H. P. bajaensis (J. Brown & Faulkner, 1992), comb. n., and Heraclides anchicayaensis Constantino, Le Crom & Salazar, 2002, stat. n., are not conspecific with H. astyalus (Godart, 1819).

Posted on October 09, 2015 18:50 by momoto-erick momoto-erick | 0 comments | Leave a comment

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