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1st day Complete!

The 2018 HSES Bioblitz got off to a successful start this morning! We observed flora and fauna near the 6th Ave entrance on the South side of the park. Please help us by reviewing our observations!

Posted on October 19, 2018 04:59 PM by hses hses | 0 comments | Leave a comment
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Education Resources to Start Preparing for CNC

Thanks to all the teachers who came to our iNaturalist training session last week! I just wanted to put a few links to education resources here to help you plan.

The CNC Education Working Group has a great set of resources (full disclosure: I helped put some of these together) accessible on the main CNC page: http://citynaturechallenge.org/education-toolkit/ The main page here has three basic getting started documents and then you can choose a grade band that's appropriate for you and find a list of 3-4 activities with descriptions (time, preparation, NGSS standards, etc.).

I mentioned this one from ESA during the training: http://www.esa.org/tiee/vol/v14/experiments/clement/abstract.html It's called "Exploring how climate will impact plant-insect distributions and interactions using open data and informatics"

Here is a general Citizen Science Toolkit from California Academy of Sciences: https://www.calacademy.org/educators/citizen-science-toolkit

Posted on October 19, 2018 02:17 PM by klodonnell klodonnell | 0 comments | Leave a comment
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Pros and cons of low-level identifications reviewed=any, quality_grade=casual

LowLevel identifications:
https://www.inaturalist.org/pages/help#coarse-ids
https://groups.google.com/forum/#!topic/inaturalist/uwtZP7VOHcA
https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/17474847

The lrank, hrank, and rank are great tools if you need to find observations at a specific rank. You can also use the Identify page to find your own observations that you haven't yet reviewed, regardless of whether others have IDed them (I also have a ton to go through myself).

able to filter with
`iconic_taxa=unknown`so they can see all their unidentified observations
/observations?lrank=phylum&place_id=any
It's verifiable=false, though, so:
https://www.inaturalist.org/observations?place_id=any&user_id=reiner&verifiable=false

They can always use the Rank filter in the Explore Filters menu to
see, for example, all observations ID to taxa of rank Phlum or coarser
like this:
https://www.inaturalist.org/observations?lrank=phylum&place_id=any

?Iconic = False is a very easy filter and gives a realistic picture of what needs to be identified.
?lrank=phylum is a mix of rubbish that has been rejected as identifiable with good data that require attention.

Smiley face

You can currently find them through the Identify page UI if you change to reviewed=any, sort by your username, and change the quality grade:
https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/identify?reviewed=any&quality_grade=casual&user_id=reiner
==

For southern Africa:
None of our plant experts (professional taxonomists) are willing to work above the level of family (and many stick to tribes). Identification above level of family is purely useless - no one is prepared to look at them. (exceptions are Mosses, Ferns and Gymnosperms, where experts tend to work above the family level)
Competent users willing to make IDs to family and tribe level (and these are rare) are happy to target the unidentified observations, but they are not enthusiastic to tackle the Phylum, and even above class level. Even the dicot and monocot level is not used. Identifications in these categories tend to get stuck there and are never visited. The complication of having all the dross hiding the good data is an issue.
A few get noticed by people working on local sites, but they would be identified no matter what their ID rank at the time.

I'll continue adding coarse IDs as needed as I personally find it helpful and many others have said the same. I frequently search to add IDs of plants, so having at least the coarse ID is necessary for that. Obviously finer IDs are better if possible (insect instead of animal), so if you can slightly finetune whatever your proces

reason to do coarse IDs is to make sure things are tagged to the point where experts can find them

[b]The lrank, hrank, and rank are great tools if you need to find observations at a specific rank. You can also use the Identify page to find your own observations that you haven't yet reviewed, regardless of whether others have IDed them (I also have a ton to go through myself).[/b]

If there are observations that really can't be IDed beyond "plant" because the photo is really really bad or something, then please mark it as no longer needing community ID.

Posted on October 19, 2018 02:06 PM by ahospers ahospers | 0 comments | Leave a comment
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Les Mammifères du Paillon

Les Mammifères ne sont pas rares dans le Paillon, mais leurs mœurs discrètes, et souvent nocturnes, peuvent les rendre difficiles à observer.

Les noctambules niçois commencent à être familiers des escapades des Sangliers (Sus scrofa) dans le Paillon. Le Rat brun (Rattus norvegicus), qui apprécie les milieux humides, est également très fréquent dans le Paillon

Mammals are not rare in the Paillon, but their discreet, and often nocturnal habits make them hard to watch.

Nice night dwellers are now pretty accustomed to the presence of Boars (Sus scrofa) in town; Brown Rat (Rattus norvegicus), that like wet areas, is also usual there.


Le Rat brun est un bon nageur. Fréquent dans le Paillon, il creuse ses galeries dans les berges.

Cependant, les Mammifères restent généralement assez discrets, et il faut se fier à des indices indirects pour attester de leur présence :


Ces indices permettent de comprendre que les Mammifères du Paillon sont peu diversifiés (comparativement à d'autres taxons), mais qu'ils sont plutôt abondants.

On trouve des traces très anciennes des Mammifères qui ont fréquenté le Paillon, par les restes fossilisés qu'ils ont laissé, et notamment sur le site de Terra Amata à Nice, où les premiers habitants d'Europe les ont chassés, au Pléistocène, il y a environ 380 000 ans : on sait ainsi que le Sanglier fréquentait déjà le lit du fleuve, et que l’Éléphant antique (Palaeoloxodon antiquus), et le Rhinocéros de prairie (Stephanorhinus hemitoechus était autrefois abondants dans le delta du fleuve, où les hommes ont pu les chasser.


Reconstitution d'une scène qui aurait pu être observée dans le lit du Paillon durant le Pléistocène, il y a environ 380 000 ans : un Éléphant antique évolue parmi la végétation avec son petit.

Posted on October 19, 2018 09:17 AM by fabienpiednoir fabienpiednoir | 0 comments | Leave a comment
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Wolf Journal #2

Date- 9/16/2018

Location- Grid #1

Tracks Detected
Common Raccoon
Mule Deer
Mountain Lion (possible)

Wildlife Observed
Pileated Woodpecker
Stellar's Jay (2)
Chipmunk (likely yellow-pine based on elevation and location)

No wolves but we did find a possible Mountain Lion track. While the wolves of the Lassen Pack are the primary goal of our search, this is really a survey of the mammals, particularly the carnivorans, that inhabit the unique habitat of this area. This is the end of the mighty Sierra Nevada range and the start of the Cascades. It is an area of excellent biodiversity and presents opportunities to find species we have not encountered. There are not only wolves here but also Sierra Nevada Red Foxes, Fishers, American Martens, Stoats, and possibly Spotted Skunks. All of those would be lifers for us and that is really a significant reason behind our wolf study. We just want to continue seeing new species and exploring California's amazing wilderness.
A Mountain Lion is far from a lifer for me or the kids but it is always fun and exciting to be around a puma. My kids were pretty pumped up and it was a strong finish to a rather dull day on the trails.

Posted on October 19, 2018 07:51 AM by kwgeiger kwgeiger | 1 observations | 0 comments | Leave a comment
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Biodiversity of Bishop Museum Campus Guide

The guide to what has been observed on Bishop Museum Campus has been updated. Here's the link - https://www.inaturalist.org/guides/8565

Posted on October 19, 2018 02:27 AM by jboone188 jboone188 | 0 comments | Leave a comment
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City Spurges - Tucson

Observations from the area.

Section Poinsettia

Euphorbia eriantha

Photo credit (left): Nathan Taylor (click here for observation). Photo credit (right): Chris Mallory (click here for observation).

Euphorbia heterophylla




Photo credit (upper left): Jay Keller (click here for observation). Photo credit (upper right): Katja Schulz (click here for observation).
Photo credit (center left): James Bailey (click here for observation). Photo credit (center right): James Bailey (click here for observation).
Photo credit (lower left): James Bailey (click here for observation). Photo credit (lower right): Nathan Taylor (click here for observation).

Section Anisophyllum

Euphorbia hyssopifolia


Photo credit (upper left): BJ Stacey (click here for observation). Photo credit (upper right): Jay Keller (click here for observation).
Photo credit (lower left): Jay Keller (click here for observation). Photo credit (lower right): Steve Jones (click here for observation).

Euphorbia hypericifolia

Photo credit (left): Nathan Taylor (click here for observation). Photo credit (right): James Bailey (click here for observation).

Euphorbia capitellata



Photo credit (upper left): CK Kelly (click here for observation). Photo credit (upper right): Chris Mallory (click here for observation).
Photo credit (center left): Chris Mallory (click here for observation). Photo credit (center right): Chris Mallory (click here for observation).
Photo credit (lower left): Chris Mallory (click here for observation). Photo credit (lower right): CK Kelly (click here for observation).

Euphorbia pediculifera

Photo credit (upper left): Nathan Taylor (click here for observation). Photo credit (upper right): Andrew Core (click here for observation).

Euphorbia melanadenia

Photo credit (upper left): Chris Mallory (click here for observation). Photo credit (upper right): Chris Mallory (click here for observation).

Euphorbia albomarginata


Photo credit (upper left): Patrick (click here for observation). Photo credit (upper right): Nathan Taylor (click here for observation).
Photo credit (lower left): Dan Beckman (click here for observation). Photo credit (lower right): Tony Palmer (click here for observation).

Euphorbia polycarpa


Photo credit (upper left): Chris Mallory (click here for observation). Photo credit (upper right): Chris Mallory (click here for observation).
Photo credit (lower left): CK Kelly (click here for observation). Photo credit (lower right): CK Kelly (click here for observation).

Euphorbia micromera

Photo credit (upper left): Nathan Taylor (click here for observation). Photo credit (upper right): Nathan Taylor (click here for observation).

Euphorbia serpens

Photo credit (upper left): CK Kelly (click here for observation). Photo credit (upper right): Nathan Taylor (click here for observation).

Euphorbia prostrata


Photo credit (upper left): Chris Mallory (click here for observation). Photo credit (upper right): Chris Mallory (click here for observation).
Photo credit (lower left): Jay Keller (click here for observation). Photo credit (lower right): Chris Mallory (click here for observation).

Euphorbia abramsiana

Photo credit (upper left): Nathan Taylor (click here for observation). Photo credit (upper right): Chris Mallory (click here for observation).

Euphorbia maculata


Photo credit (upper left): Nathan Taylor (click here for observation). Photo credit (upper right): wingedchimera (click here for observation).
Photo credit (lower left): CK Kelly (click here for observation). Photo credit (lower right): Jay Keller (click here for observation).

Euphorbia arizonica

Photo credit (left): Chris Mallory (click here for observation). Photo credit (right): Katja Schulz (click here for observation).

Euphorbia setiloba

Photo credit (upper left): Jay Keller (click here for observation). Photo credit (upper right): CK Kelly (click here for observation).

Euphorbia florida


Photo credit (upper left): James Bailey (click here for observation). Photo credit (upper right): Nathan Taylor (click here for observation).
Photo credit (lower left): Ken-ichi Ueda (click here for observation). Photo credit (lower right): Nathan Taylor (click here for observation).

Euphorbia gracillima

Photo credit (left): CK Kelly (click here for observation). Photo credit (right): Nathan Taylor (click here for observation; several close-ups at that link).

Posted on October 19, 2018 01:59 AM by nathantaylor nathantaylor | 0 comments | Leave a comment
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7 Observations

Enjoy!

Posted on October 18, 2018 11:21 PM by mckins mckins | 7 observations | 0 comments | Leave a comment
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Hackfalls Round 2

A successful trip to Hackfalls Arboretum for a second round of tree photographs. This time a 2 day trip, with around 1500 photographs to sort through. With an overnight stay, I was able to get out the home made moth trap, and despite a small hiccup in the plan when I encountered some noisy cantankerous bull calves late in the evening (I seriously thought they would wake the whole East Coast), I managed a nice little assortment of roughly 30 moths that I have never encountered before. Some foraging for spiders also netted about 20, but mostly ones I have observed before.

Posted on October 18, 2018 08:29 PM by kiwifergus kiwifergus | 0 comments | Leave a comment
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Kick-off the 2018 Field Season

It’s that time of year again: pumpkin carving, apple picking, and...tidepooling! We’re kicking off the field season with an All-Reef Survey on November 8th!

The last time we were out there was in August, so we are curious what we will see! We’ll be doing a reef bioblitz and documenting our findings here on iNaturalist. Bring your family and friends as we explore the reef, make new observations, and learn about our local tidepools.

To sign up and learn more about this event, please fill out this form with your name and email.

Pillar-Point

Photo: Pillar Point

To stay informed on future Citizen Science Events, sign up for our newsletter here.

Posted on October 18, 2018 05:51 PM by cwegs cwegs | 0 comments | Leave a comment
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All bats big and small: Southern California is a popular home for the winged creatures of the night.

Halloween and blood-sucking vampires in the movies give bats a bad name, but around here, bats eat insects and nectar and are very beneficial to us nonflying mammals.

https://www.dailybulletin.com/2018/10/17/all-bats-big-and-small-southern-california-is-a-popular-home-for-the-winged-creatures-of-the-night/

Posted on October 18, 2018 02:41 PM by biohexx1 biohexx1 | 1 comments | Leave a comment
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Owl ensnared in California kite string rescued, ‘grumpily flies off’.

A great horned owl in California found itself tied up on Monday when the tip of its wing became tangled in a kite string, leaving the bird dangling from a tree.

Authorities launched a rescue effort to free the owl after a resident reported seeing the distressed bird, the San Jose Mercury News reported.

https://www.foxnews.com/us/owl-ensnared-in-california-kite-string-rescued-grumpily-flies-off

Posted on October 18, 2018 02:37 PM by biohexx1 biohexx1 | 1 comments | Leave a comment
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Mountain lion cub that walked into California bakery euthanized.

The mountain lion cub that wandered inside a Calfornia bakery on Monday was euthanized, authorities said.

The 4-month-old cub startled a bakery employee in Pollock Pines, which is about 60 miles east of Sacramento, on Monday afternoon, the Los Angeles Times reported.

https://www.foxnews.com/us/mountain-lion-cub-that-walked-into-california-bakery-euthanized

Posted on October 18, 2018 02:32 PM by biohexx1 biohexx1 | 0 comments | Leave a comment
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Le Faisan, nicheur dans le Paillon ?

Certains êtres vivants du Paillon, quoique discrets, sont pour le moins impressionnants : si les noctambules niçois sont de moins en moins étonnés par la présence du Sanglier (Sus scrofa) en ville, la présence d'un autre gibier, probablement descendu comme lui des collines du Nord de Nice, est plus insolite : le Faisan à collier (Phasianus colchicus).
Some organisms found in the Paillon, though shy, are still pretty impressive : Nice night dwellers are now but few amazed by the presence of the Boar (Sus scrofa) in town, but the presence of another animal, probably also came from the northern hills, is far far more bizarre : the Common Pheasant (Phasianus colchicus).

En Octobre 2017, un mâle avait suscité l'étonnement en jaillissant d'un taillis, avenue Maréchal Lyautey, sur les berges du Paillon, à quelques mètres seulement du Lycée Guillaume Apollinaire. En pleine période automnale, les lâchers de Faisans ou de Perdrix sont assez courants dans les collines avoisinantes, et la possibilité d'un animal issu d'un lâcher, venu se perdre dans Nice, avait été évoquée. Cela aurait pu expliquer le comportement peu farouche d'un animal né en captivité, et habitué à ne pas avoir peur de l'homme.
In October, 2017, a male cause surprise by getting out of a thicket, av. Mal Lyautey, on the bank of the Paillon, a few meters away only from the High School Guillaume Apollinaire. During autumn, game birds releasing are common in the hills nearby, and the hypothesis of a lost specimen in Nice was considered : it could explain why the bird look so appearingly daring...

Cependant, selon une attitude bien connue des chasseurs, l'animal avait jailli subitement du taillis à l'approche de l'observateur, puis s'était éloigné lentement de l'endroit, en restant bien visible, les couleurs vives de la tête le rendant très voyant. Pendant ce temps, un bruit à proximité indiquait qu'un autre animal de grande taille, resté invisible, s'enfuyait. Une femelle, peut-être ? Le faisan est en effet connu pour quitter son abri à l'approche du danger, afin de créer une distraction. En tous cas, si femelle il y avait, elle était ce jour-là restée invisible...
The animal actually sprang out of the bosk when the observer came, and then quietly moved away, keeping always in sight, its bright colours making it pretty consipious. In the meantime, a sound heard nearby indicated another great animal was running away : female maybe ? The pheasant is, indeed, known to leave its shelter when danger is coming, in order to create a distraction. Whatever, if the female was ever present, it wasn't seen that day...

Jusqu'à aujourd'hui.
Until today.

En Octobre 2018, un an après l'observation du mâle, une femelle a été aperçue pour la première fois dans le lit du Paillon, près du Palais des Expositions, à quelques centaines de mètres de la précédente observation. S'agit-il de l'animal qui avait été entendu, mais était resté caché un an plus tôt ? D'un nouvel animal égaré lors d'un lâcher ? Difficile à dire, cette dernière hypothèse semblant cependant assez peu probable : les lâchers effectués pour la chasse sont par définition assez éloignés des agglomérations, et la probabilité que deux animaux à seulement un an d'intervalle aient échoué au même endroit est peu plausible.
In October, 2018, a year after the male observation, a female was spot for the first time in the river bed, near the Palais des Expositions, a hundred meters away from the last one. Was it the animal heard, but that kept hidden, one year earlier ? A new lost animal from a game releasing ? Hard to say, but this last hypothesis is unlikely : releasing are always done away from cities, and the probability that two different animals got in the same place within only a year is umprobable.

En tous cas, une chose est certaine, c'est qu'il ne peut en aucun cas s'agir de l'animal photographié l'année précédente, puisque celui-ci est une femelle... Les Faisans du Paillon sont donc toujours là au moins un an après, et ils sont au moins deux... pour le moment ?
One thing however is certain, this is not the same animal than the one spotted last year, as this one is a female... The Paillon Pheasants are so still there a year after, and they are, at least, two... For now ?

Posted on October 18, 2018 01:58 PM by fabienpiednoir fabienpiednoir | 0 comments | Leave a comment
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October 18, 2018: Fungi

Our observations completed today included at least 6 new species of fungi found surrounding the Islands High School football field. The climate of today's observations was 67 degrees fahrenheit with a humidity of 72%. Due to the high humidity and low temperature many new species of fungi were able to rise and grow above the ground. We surveyed around the football field and an area on the side of the school.

Posted on October 18, 2018 01:10 PM by aj_55 aj_55 | 0 comments | Leave a comment
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10/18: verts

Today was sunny with 69 degrees as well as around a 10mph winds. Most species recorded where aeril primarly birds. Wa also captured a tree frog as well aa a house geko

Posted on October 18, 2018 01:10 PM by kadenhetager kadenhetager | 0 comments | Leave a comment
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Oct. 18, 2018 (Invertebrate No Exoskeleton)

We moved around the school at the area around the football field. Most notably, we found the caterpillar of the Giant Leopard Moth (Hypercompe scribonia). The other invertebrate we found was an unidentified small white moth.

Posted on October 18, 2018 01:10 PM by thomas_sl thomas_sl | 0 comments | Leave a comment
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10/16/18 Plant Group

The day we collected data was October 16th, 2018. The temperature was degrees fahrenheit with cloudy skies. The goal of the task was to take pictures of as many plants as possible. There was a wide variety of plant species in the area.

Posted on October 18, 2018 01:09 PM by sturmtrupp1918 sturmtrupp1918 | 0 comments | Leave a comment
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October 16, 2018

During our fungi observation on October 16, 11 different species were found in areas surrounding the greenhouse of Islands High School. The weather at the time of the observations outside was humid with an average temperature of 76 degrees fahrenheit (24 1/4 degrees celsius). The terrain was easy to survey. There was not much work in searching out the fungi and photographing it.

Posted on October 18, 2018 12:11 PM by aj_55 aj_55 | 0 comments | Leave a comment
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10-16 Invertebrates (with no exoskeleton) Group

On October 16th, 2018, we went outside for around 20 minutes. The sky was completely clouded, with humid and slightly cold temperature. We first dug a hole of about 1 foot, in both diameter and depth. Nothing was found. We tried digging another hole, on the edge of the mulch around a nearby tree. 3 larvae of the May beetle (Phyllophaga) were found almost instantly.

Posted on October 18, 2018 12:10 PM by thomas_sl thomas_sl | 1 observations | 0 comments | Leave a comment
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Inverts no exo

The data we observed was a centipede, and a grub. We looked under boxes that have been sitting out there for a while now. The grub was found under a rock. We attempted to search for a worm but was never found.

Posted on October 18, 2018 12:08 PM by jl23 jl23 | 0 comments | Leave a comment
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10/16/18: Vertebrates

During our data collection I observed a small black bird flying east to southwest. It was a Turdus merula. It was located flying from 1b to 2. The weather condition was overcast and 72 degrees.

Posted on October 18, 2018 12:04 PM by vaibhavpatel vaibhavpatel | 0 comments | Leave a comment
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10/16/18: Inverts with no Exo

During our data collection on the 16th we observed a green fuzzy caterpillar crawling up a wall in zone 1a by the door. We also observed an unidentified butterfly flying around from zone 2 to zone 1b.It was a very wet outside, a little overcost , and 2 mile er hour winds

Posted on October 18, 2018 12:03 PM by blessemfairley blessemfairley | 0 comments | Leave a comment
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10/16/18: Inverts with no Exo

During our data collection on the 16th we observed a green fuzzy caterpillar crawling up a wall in zone 1a by the door. We also observed an unidentified butterfly flying around from zone 2 to zone 1b.It was a very wet outside, a little overcost , and 2 mile er hour winds

Posted on October 18, 2018 12:00 PM by blessemfairley blessemfairley | 0 comments | Leave a comment
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二格山 ‧ 秋日賞蝶小旅行

秋蟬輕鳴,西風送涼,浪漫的秋日,正是賞蝶的好時節!在欣賞蝴蝶之美時,你可曾想過,蝴蝶為什麼要戀花?優雅的蝴蝶又有哪些有趣的行為呢?

這次,我們要帶你來到二格山,秋天的山林生氣蓬勃,小巧飽滿的野果纍纍、高大的樹木悄悄地開滿了花,飛舞的蝴蝶就像山神的使者,引領人們窺探山林的美麗角落。

誠摯邀請您和我們一起來到二格山,在微涼的秋意中漫步,跟著解說員輕鬆的步伐,踏入充滿生命力的山林,發現潛藏其中的祕密,蝴蝶、開花的樹、森林的密語,你將驚奇的發現,自然的安排每一處都巧妙,只要有心就能看見!

【活動日期】民國107年10月21日(星期日)早上9:15至下午4:30,須自備簡便午餐。

【主辦單位】荒野保護協會 台北分會

【活動地點】新北市石碇鄉二格山區

【活動內容】步道生態導覽、自然體驗、自然創作DIY

【活動對象】一般民眾 (年齡限8歲以上),名額30人,歡迎親子一同參與。若活動報名人數未達25人即不開團。

【集合地點】二格山佛濟寺 (新北市石碇區二格路9號)
【交通方式】(1)自備交通工具:

北宜公路自台北向宜蘭方向,將近23公里前,左轉「二格道路」(此為產業道路,較不明顯,請注意路名指示牌)。往前直行約3分鐘,於岔路處右轉,便可抵達佛濟寺。

(2)公車:

於新店捷運站搭乘新店客運「綠12」線,車程約35分鐘,於北宜公路上的「二格公園站」下車。下車後往回走,右轉二格道路,步行約15分鐘,於岔路處右轉,便可抵達佛濟寺。

(綠「12」為固定班次,假日於新店捷運站發車時間為6:15、7:15、8:15。詳情參考http://sindianbus.com.tw/modules/tadnews/index.php?nsn=9

【必備物品】午餐、點心、飲用水(至少1000c.c.)、雨傘和雨衣、遮陽用品,以及快樂開放的心。

【參考物品】相機、望遠鏡、圖鑑、健保卡。

【注意事項】

1.因二格山位於東北季風迎風面,氣候較為濕冷,溫度較平地約低3度,請準備適當保暖衣物,以及雨具備用,並穿著舒適好走、防滑的休閒鞋、登山鞋或雨鞋(請勿穿著美麗的涼鞋或皮鞋)。

2.無論晴雨,本活動照常舉行,若活動當日中央氣象局發佈陸上颱風警報或有安全疑慮的豪雨特報等惡劣天候,活動將順延擇期舉辦,或扣除部分行政費用後退款。

3.山區垃圾清運不易,請帶走當天所有自己製造的垃圾,除了腳印和回憶,什麼都不要留下喔!

4.完成報名手續者,協會將於活動前三天以電子郵件寄送「行前通知單」,

活動前將不再以其他形式另行通知,請留意信箱,若活動前仍未接獲通知者,煩請主動與協會聯繫。

【活動前洽詢專線】荒野保護協會 台北分會 曾小姐 (02)2307-1317分機21

【報名日期】即日起受理線上報名(www.sow.org.tw),額滿為止,並為辦理保險,請備妥活動報名者之身分證字號、聯絡方式及出生年月日等資料,恕不接受傳真及現場報名

【報名費用】會員250元,非會員350元(費用內含:旅遊平安保險、講師解說、行政雜支等)

※本活動為每位學員投保100萬平安保險;活動由荒野二格組解說員帶領,解說費用將全數捐贈荒野保護協會,作為保育及教育推廣之用途,感謝您的行動支持。

【繳費方式】電話報名確認後三日內,以劃撥、信用卡或親至協會繳費;未在報名後三日內繳費者視同棄權,謝謝您的配合!

【劃撥帳戶/支票抬頭】社團法人中華民國荒野保護協會

【劃撥帳號】18724292

信用卡方式繳費或劃撥繳費,請於收據上註明姓名、活動名稱後,傳真至02-2307-2568,並於傳真後立即來電(02)2307-1568確認,謝謝!
【退費標準】

報名後七天內通知取消者,酌收行政費100元。
報名後第八天起通知取消者,酌收行政費150元。
活動前一個星期內通知取消者,恕不退費。
活動當日若中央氣象局發佈陸上颱風警報或豪雨特報、路況受損等不可抗拒之因素,致活動被迫取消,將退還90%活動費用,感謝您與我們共同分擔已發生之行政費用。
因本會之特殊緣故致活動無法成行,請持繳費單據本會將辦理全額退費。
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Posted on October 18, 2018 08:30 AM by bunnytailgrass bunnytailgrass | 0 comments | Leave a comment
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在開始之前

自日治時代以來,臺灣的蝴蝶無論在科學、文化與商業上,其無窮的魅力長期吸引了國內外民間人士亦或區域學者的目光,迄今已有至少10本的專書紀錄描述與討論台灣蝴蝶的生活史、習性與外觀變化等,甚或在多年前以本地蝴蝶製成的工藝美術品,目前仍是無價的典藏。在眾多的努力下,台灣已記錄到將近四百種蝴蝶物種,其中所包含的多樣性與型態變化,在東南亞眾多島嶼間皆具有舉足輕重的代表性。

現今由於數位紀錄工具的技術進步且取得容易,高品質的觀察紀錄相較以往更容易獲得,加上這些紀錄能夠在數個社群網站詢問與分享,得到的回饋促使民眾更願意拿起手機拍下生活中看到的蝴蝶。為了能夠結合研究單位與公民觀察蝴蝶所聚集的龐大潛能,共同建構更完整的臺灣蝴蝶多樣性地圖,我們將邀請民眾一同加入「臺灣蝴蝶閃電調查」的蝴蝶觀察活動,藉由iNaturalist自然觀察工具,在每個月統一的時間探索全臺各地的蝴蝶物種組成,並紀錄觀察地點的棲地資訊,跟著我們一起追蹤全台蝴蝶的動態變化吧!這些觀測到的數據長期累積下來,將來更可以協助大家瞭解蝴蝶的生態資訊、地理分佈以及物種現況。

調查方法

時間:每月的第一個周末。

地點:每個參加者能到達並紀錄的地方。

方法:拍照!上傳!紀錄!紀錄蝴蝶就這麼簡單!📱📷

只要拍攝蝴蝶的生態照,經由iNaturalist手機版或電腦版上傳,並紀錄以下資訊:

  1. 蝴蝶物種名稱
  2. 時間
  3. 地點
  4. 棲地及食草資訊(手機版請填寫在“備註”欄位,電腦版請填寫在“描述”欄位)

附註:

  1. 調查當日在同一個觀察地點發現相同物種時,只需上傳第一筆紀錄即可。
  2. 拍下蝴蝶的特徵以利辨識,但以不干擾蝴蝶為原則。
  3. 蝴蝶很漂亮,但在離開的時候請記得讓牠們在原地繼續開開心心地飛舞喔。
Posted on October 18, 2018 03:41 AM by wjchen wjchen | 0 comments | Leave a comment
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"The earth's largest single organism"

Interesting. https://www.inverse.com/article/49975-utah-s-pando-aspen-clone-is-dying One wonders if certain fungi might challenge for that title.

Posted on October 18, 2018 03:14 AM by thebark thebark | 0 comments | Leave a comment
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Sixth Wave

We are in the sixth wave. We are part of it. The sixth wave being not only a matter of tigers and Indian rhinoceros and spotted owls and so on, but of what have been among the most common animal species fairly low down the food chain. https://www.washingtonpost.com/science/2018/10/15/hyperalarming-study-shows-massive-insect-loss/?utm_term=.b27c74fd52dd

What we do here at iNaturalist is to act as eulogists testifying to what was and is becoming not. Or witnesses to a crime. Or co-perps. Take your choice.

Posted on October 18, 2018 02:09 AM by thebark thebark | 0 comments | Leave a comment
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Changing Tactics!

As the broader BiomeSTL project has coalesced, we've decided to shift our iNaturalist project to a standard collection project as opposed to an umbrella. While we value the various constituent projects throughout the region and are eager to support them, the umbrella project is really intended for competitions (ala the City Nature Project). The Collections project has been created and can be accessed at: https://www.inaturalist.org/projects/biomestl-collection

I plan to invite everyone who follows this project to join the new one.

Posted on October 17, 2018 08:21 PM by jabhartley jabhartley | 0 comments | Leave a comment