June 01, 2018

Subspecies - Antelope

I like to help with the identification of mammal species, but I'm not always up to date with what the latest subspecies are, or I forget which ones are "safe" to use.
Below is my attempt at making sense of the most commonly encountered subspecies for Mammals in southern Africa:
This list is not "scientifically accurate", but instead just a guideline for myself (and maybe others) to follow.



Klipspringer


Oreotragus oreotragus oreotragus
Good to use, when possible.
In the south-west of South Africa (Northern Cape, Western Cape and Eastern Cape).
Be careful with boundary between subspecies.


Oreotragus oreotragus tyleri
Good to use, when possible.
In the far north-west of southern Africa (Namibia and Angola).
Be careful with boundary between subspecies.


Oreotragus oreotragus transvaalensis
Good to use, when possible.
In the north-east of South Africa (Limpopo, North West, Mpumalanga, KwaZulu-Natal and southern Mozambique).
Be careful with boundary between subspecies.


Oreotragus oreotragus stevensoni
Good to use, when possible.
In the central north of southern Africa (Zimbabwe and Botswana).
Be careful with boundary between subspecies.




Bushbuck


Tragelaphus scriptus (???)
Bad, do not use.
The taxonomy is still very unclear.
The Bushbuck from north and west Africa is Tragelaphus scriptus.
Tragelaphus sylvaticus is the subspecies present in southern Africa.
On iNaturalist the taxonomy tree seems to treat Tragelaphus sylvaticus as a subspecies of Tragelaphus scriptus instead.
These will have to be cleaned up once the taxonomy settles down a bit.
Some people on iNaturalist push for the use of Tragelaphus scriptus sylvaticus to make it easier later down the line to split the subspecies.
Personally I feel even in Tragelaphus scriptus sylvaticus the animals from the North seem to differ noticeably from the South, so I'm not sold on the grouping as it is now.




Steenbok


Raphicerus campestris campestris
Not used, but can be used.
For the southern African population. To distinguish it from eastern African population.
(There might be other more precise subspecies described in the future.)




Common Duiker


Sylvicapra grimmia grimmia
Bad, do not use.
Not well defined (especially at boundaries).
From the southern parts of South Africa (Western Cape, Eastern Cape and Northern Cape).
These are apparently "greyer" than other animals, but to my eye they seem much more reddish.


Sylvicapra grimmia caffra
Bad, do not use.
Not well defined (especially at boundaries).
From the northern parts of South Africa (KwaZulu-Natal, North West, Gauteng, Mpumalanga, Limpopo, southern Mozambique and eastern Zimbabwe).


Sylvicapra grimmia steinhardti
Bad, do not use.
Not well defined (especially at boundaries).
From the northern parts of South Africa (northern parts of Northern Cape, Namibia, Angola and parts of Botswana).
These are apparently "sandy-coloured".




Springbok


Antidorcas marsupialis marsupialis
Good to use, when possible.
From the far south.
(Be careful of breeding and game farms.)


Antidorcas marsupialis hofmeyri
Good to use, when possible.
From Botswana, Namibia and the Northern Cape.
(Be careful of breeding and game farms.)


Antidorcas marsupialis angolensis
Good to use, when possible.
From Angola.
(Be careful of breeding and game farms.)




Blue Duiker


Philantomba monticola monticola
Good to use, when possible.
Be careful, there seems to be overlap.
From Western Cape and Eastern Cape.
Dark blue-grey above.


Philantomba monticola bicolor
Good to use, when possible.
Be careful, there seems to be overlap.
From KwaZulu-Natal (east coast).
Smoky-blue and slightly brownish especially towards the rear.


Philantomba monticola hecki
Good to use, when possible.
Be careful, there seems to be overlap.
From north KwaZulu-Natal to Mozambique.
Richly colored, rusty-brown.




Eland


Tragelaphus oryx oryx
Good to use.
From South Africa, Namibia and Botswanna.
Tawny fur with practically no stripes.
(Validity of different subspecies are in dispute.)




Kudu


Tragelaphus strepsiceros strepsiceros
Good to use.
Only subspecies in southern Africa.




Gemsbok


Oryx gazella gazella
Not used, but can be used.
Oryx gazella beisa used to be the other subspecies, but it is now considered a separate species, leaving only Oryx gazella gazella.
No other subspecies have been identified in southern Africa.




Impala


Aepyceros melampus melampus
Good to use.
From the North-Eastern parts of southern Africa.
Usually no black marking on the nose, but it can be visible to a varying degree in some animals.


Aepyceros melampus petersi
Good to use.
Found at Etosha.
Large black area on the nose.




Waterbuck


Kobus ellipsiprymnus ellipsiprymnus
Good to use.
Only subspecies in southern Africa (except towards Zambia).
Has a clear white ring around the tail.


Kobus ellipsiprymnus defassa
Good to use.
Towards Zambia.
Does not have a white ring, but the entire area is white below the tail.




Tsessebe


Damaliscus lunatus lunatus
Good to use.
Only subspecies in southern Africa (although there are others to the North).




Blesbok / Bontebok


Damaliscus pygargus phillipsi
Can be used, but be careful with hybrids.
Known as Blesbok.
Found in the central parts of south Africa.
Can be distinguished from Bontebok based on colour.
(Hybrids do exist.)


Damaliscus pygargus pygargus
Can be used, but be careful with hybrids.
Known as Bontebok.
Found in the southern parts of south Africa.
Can be distinguished from Blesbok based on colour.
(Hybrids do exist.)




Hartebeest


Alcelaphus buselaphus caama
Good to use.
Found throughout most of southern Africa (especially the drier areas).


Alcelaphus buselaphus lichtensteinii
Good to use.
Found in the far North of Kruger and towards Zambia, Malawi and northern Mozambique.




Oribi


Ourebia ourebi ourebi
Good to use.
From South Africa and South-Central Mozambique.


Ourebia ourebi hastatab
Good to use.
From South-East Zimbabwe and North Mozambique.


Ourebia ourebi rutila
Good to use.
From Namibia, Botswana and North-West Zimbabwe.




Roan Antelope


Hippotragus equinus equinus and Hippotragus equinus cottoni
Bad, do not use.
Possible problems with hybrids and validity of the declared subspecies.
The current understanding is that these two subspecies in the southern African region often treated as one (and hybridized) by conservation and especially private owners. It also seems that there is little significant genetic difference between the two, but more research is needed.




Sable Antelope


Hippotragus niger niger
Good to use.
The southern African subspecies (there are others).
Be careful for possible hybrids.
Posted on June 01, 2018 02:29 PM by henrydelange henrydelange | 0 comments | Leave a comment

March 17, 2018

iNatualist Links

Some parts of the iNaturalist website isn't easily accessible from the main user interface.
The idea of this page is to keep track of a list of useful links:

iNaturalist Blog
https://www.inaturalist.org/blog

Comments
See and search comments.
https://www.inaturalist.org/comments?mine=true

Heatmaps
Currently the heatmap radius is very small and the heatmap effect goes away fairly quickly, showing only the observation pins.
https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/map?user_id=henrydelange#7/-33.654/20.33
https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/map?project_id=14074#8/-33.504/18.981

Identification Statistics
This page provides a more detailed view of a user's identifications.
https://www.inaturalist.org/identifications?user_id=henrydelange

Platform Statistics
https://www.inaturalist.org/stats
https://www.inaturalist.org/stats/2017
https://www.inaturalist.org/stats/2017/henrydelange

List of Applications
https://www.inaturalist.org/oauth/applications

List of Observation Fields
https://www.inaturalist.org/observation_fields

Posted on March 17, 2018 07:56 AM by henrydelange henrydelange | 0 comments | Leave a comment

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